Upgrading Applications

If you have an existing Zend Framework v2 application, and want to update it to the latest versions, you will have some special considerations.

Upgrading Zend Framework

Since the 2.5 release, the zendframework package has been essentially a "metapackage", defining no code, and only dependencies on the various component packages. This means that when you install zendframework/zendframework, you get the full set of components, at the latest 2.* versions.

With the release of version 3, we recommend:

The process would look like this:

$ composer remove zendframework/zendframework
$ composer require zendframework/zend-component-installer
$ composer require zendframework/zend-mvc
# Repeat as necessary for components you use if not already installed

When you install zend-mvc, it will prompt you to add configuration for components; choose either application.config.php or modules.config.php, and re-use your selection for all other packages. This step ensures that the various components installed, and any news ones you add later, are configured in your application correctly.

This approach will ensure you are only installing what you actually need. As an example, if you are not using zend-barcode, or zend-permissions-acl, or zend-mail, there's no reason to install them.

Keeping the zendframework package

If you want to upgrade quickly, and cannot easily determine which components you use in your application, you can upgrade your zendframework requirement. When you do, you should also install the zend-component-installer, to ensure that component configuration is properly injected in your application.

$ composer require zendframework/zend-component-installer "zendframework/zendframework:^3.0"

During installation, it will prompt you to add configuration for components; choose either application.config.php or modules.config.php, and re-use your selection for all other packages. This step ensures that the various components installed, and any news ones you add later, are configured in your application correctly.

This will upgrade you to the latest releases of all Zend Framework components at once; it will also install new components developed as part of the version 3 initiative.

We still recommend reducing your dependencies at a later date, however.

Integration packages

During the Zend Framework 3 initiative, one goal was to reduce the number of dependencies for each package. This affected the MVC in particular, as a number of features were optional or presented deep integrations between the MVC and other components. These include the following:

Console tooling

If you were using the MVC console tooling, and are doing a partial update per the recommendations, you will need to install zend-mvc-console.

Forms integration

If you were using the forms in your MVC application, and are doing a partial update per the recommendations, you will need to install zend-mvc-form.

i18n integration

If you were using i18n features in your MVC application, and are doing a partial update per the recommendations, you will need to install zend-mvc-i18n.

Plugins

If you were using any of the prg(), fileprg(), identity(), or flashMessenger() MVC controller plugins, and are doing a partial update per the recommendations, you will need to install zend-mvc-plugins.

zend-di integration

If you were using the zend-servicemanager <-> zend-di integration within your application, you will need to install zend-servicemanager-di.

Autoloading

If you are doing a partial upgrade per the above recommendations (vs. upgrading the full zendframework package), one change is that zend-loader is no longer installed by default, nor recommended. Instead, we recommend using Composer for autoloading.

As such, you will need to setup autoloading rules for each module specific to your application.

As an example, if you are still defining the default Application module, you can add autoloading for it as follows in your project's composer.json:

"autoload": {
    "psr-4": {
        "Application\\": "module/Application/src/Application/"
    },
    "files":  [
        "module/Application/Module.php"
    ]
}

The above creates a PSR-4 autoloading rule for the Application module, telling it to look in the module/Application/src/Application/ directory. Since the Application\Module class is defined at the module root, we specify it in the files configuration.

To improve on this, and simplify autoloading, we recommend adopting a complete PSR-4 directory structure for your module class files. As an example, to change the existing Application module to PSR-4, you can do the following:

$ cd module/Application
$ mv src temp
$ mv temp/Application src
$ rm -Rf ./temp
$ mv Module.php src/

Update your Module.php file to do the following:

You can then update the autoload configuration to:

"autoload": {
    "psr-4": {
        "Application\\": "module/Application/src/"
    }
}

Afterwards, run the following to update the generated autoloader:

$ composer dump-autoload

The updated application skeleton already takes this approach.

Bootstrap

Because version 3 requires usage of Composer for autoloading, you can simplify your application bootstrap.

First, if you were using an init_autoloader.php file, you can now remove it.

Second, update your public/index.php to read as follows:

<?php

use Zend\Mvc\Application;

/**
 * This makes our life easier when dealing with paths. Everything is relative
 * to the application root now.
 */
chdir(dirname(__DIR__));

// Decline static file requests back to the PHP built-in webserver
if (php_sapi_name() === 'cli-server') {
    $path = realpath(__DIR__ . parse_url($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'], PHP_URL_PATH));
    if (__FILE__ !== $path && is_file($path)) {
        return false;
    }
    unset($path);
}

// Composer autoloading
include __DIR__ . '/../vendor/autoload.php';

if (! class_exists(Application::class)) {
    throw new RuntimeException(
        "Unable to load application.\n"
        . "- Type `composer install` if you are developing locally.\n"
    );
}

// Run the application!
Application::init(require __DIR__ . '/../config/application.config.php')->run();

Scripts

The skeleton application for version 2 shipped three scripts with it:

If you are upgrading an existing application, these will still be present. However, if you are starting a new application, and used these previously, they are no longer present.

Development mode

Version 3 of the skeleton application adds a requirement on zfcampus/zf-development-mode, which provides a way to store common development-specific settings in your repository and then selectively enable/disable them during development.

If you are upgrading from an existing application, you can install this feature:

$ composer require zfcampus/zf-development-mode

Please refer to the package documentation for details on how to setup your application configuration to make use of this feature.