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SMTP Authentication

zend-mail supports the use of SMTP authentication, which can be enabled via configuration. The available built-in authentication methods are PLAIN, LOGIN, and CRAM-MD5, all of which expect 'username' and 'password' values in the configuration array.

Configuration

In order to enable authentication, ou need to specify a "connection class" and connection configuration when configuring your SMTP transport. The two settings are briefly covered in the SMTP transport configuration options. Below are more details.

connection_class

The connection class should be a fully qualified class name of a Zend\Mail\Protocol\Smtp\Auth\* class or extension, or the short name (name without leading namespace). zend-mail ships with the following:

  • Zend\Mail\Protocol\Smtp\Auth\Plain, or plain
  • Zend\Mail\Protocol\Smtp\Auth\Login, or login
  • Zend\Mail\Protocol\Smtp\Auth\Crammd5, or crammd5

Custom connection classes must be extensions of Zend\Mail\Protocol\Smtp.

connection_config

The connection_config should be an associative array of options to provide to the underlying connection class. All shipped connection classes require:

  • username
  • password

Optionally, ou may also provide:

  • ssl: either the value ssl or tls.
  • port: if using something other than the default port for the protocol used. Port 25 is the default used for non-SSL connections, 465 for SSL, and 587 for TLS.
  • use_complete_quit: configuring whether or not an SMTP transport should issue a QUIT at __destruct() and/or end of script execution. Useful in long-running scripts against SMTP servers that implements a reuse time limit.

Examples

SMTP Transport Usage with PLAIN AUTH

use Zend\Mail\Transport\Smtp as SmtpTransport;
use Zend\Mail\Transport\SmtpOptions;

// Setup SMTP transport using PLAIN authentication
$transport = new SmtpTransport();
$options   = new SmtpOptions([
    'name'              => 'localhost.localdomain',
    'host'              => '127.0.0.1',
    'connection_class'  => 'plain',
    'connection_config' => [
        'username' => 'user',
        'password' => 'pass',
    ],
]);
$transport->setOptions($options);

SMTP Transport Usage with LOGIN AUTH

use Zend\Mail\Transport\Smtp as SmtpTransport;
use Zend\Mail\Transport\SmtpOptions;

// Setup SMTP transport using LOGIN authentication
$transport = new SmtpTransport();
$options   = new SmtpOptions([
    'name'              => 'localhost.localdomain',
    'host'              => '127.0.0.1',
    'connection_class'  => 'login',
    'connection_config' => [
        'username' => 'user',
        'password' => 'pass',
    ],
]);
$transport->setOptions($options);

SMTP Transport Usage with CRAM-MD5 AUTH

use Zend\Mail\Transport\Smtp as SmtpTransport;
use Zend\Mail\Transport\SmtpOptions;

// Setup SMTP transport using CRAM-MD5 authentication
$transport = new SmtpTransport();
$options   = new SmtpOptions([
    'name'              => 'localhost.localdomain',
    'host'              => '127.0.0.1',
    'connection_class'  => 'crammd5',
    'connection_config' => [
        'username' => 'user',
        'password' => 'pass',
    ],
]);
$transport->setOptions($options);

SMTP Transport Usage with PLAIN AUTH over TLS

use Zend\Mail\Transport\Smtp as SmtpTransport;
use Zend\Mail\Transport\SmtpOptions;

// Setup SMTP transport using PLAIN authentication over TLS
$transport = new SmtpTransport();
$options   = new SmtpOptions([
    'name'              => 'example.com',
    'host'              => '127.0.0.1',
    'port'              => 587,
    // Notice port change for TLS is 587
    'connection_class'  => 'plain',
    'connection_config' => [
        'username' => 'user',
        'password' => 'pass',
        'ssl'      => 'tls',
    ],
]);
$transport->setOptions($options);

SMTP Transport Usage for servers with reuse time limit

By default, every Zend\Mail\Protocol\Smtp\* class tries to disconnect from the STMP server by sending a QUIT command and expecting a 221 (Service closing transmission channel) response code. This is done automatically at object destruction (via the __destruct() method), and can generate errors with SMTP servers like Postfix that implement a reuse time limit:

// [...]
$transport->send($message);

var_dump('E-mail sent');
sleep(305);
var_dump('Soon to exit...');
exit;

// E-mail sent
// Soon to exit...
// Notice: fwrite(): send of 6 bytes failed with errno=32 Broken pipe in ./zend-mail/src/Protocol/AbstractProtocol.php on line 255
// Fatal error: Uncaught Zend\Mail\Protocol\Exception\RuntimeException: Could not read from 127.0.0.1 in ./zend-mail/src/Protocol/AbstractProtocol.php:301

To avoid this error, you can set a time limit for the SMTP connection in SmtpOptions:

use Zend\Mail\Transport\Smtp as SmtpTransport;
use Zend\Mail\Transport\SmtpOptions;

// Setup SMTP transport to exit without the `QUIT` command
$transport = new SmtpTransport();
$options   = new SmtpOptions([
    'name'                  => 'localhost.localdomain',
    'host'                  => '127.0.0.1',
    'connection_time_limit' => 300, // recreate the connection 5 minutes after connect()
    'connection_class'      => 'plain',
    'connection_config'     => [
        'username'            => 'user',
        'password'            => 'pass',
        'use_complete_quit'   => false, // Dont send 'QUIT' on __destruct()
    ],
]);
$transport->setOptions($options);

Setting connection_time_limit will automatically set use_complete_quit to false, so the connection with the SMTP server will be closed without the QUIT command.

NOTE: recreate old connection

The use_complete_quit flag described above aims to avoid errors that you cannot manage from PHP.

If you deal with SMTP servers that exhibit this behavior from within long-running scripts, you SHOULD use the flag along with the connection_time_limit flag to ensure you recreate the connection.

Since 2.10.0

The connection_time_limit flag has been available since 2.10.0.

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