Config Abstract Factory

You can simplify the process of creating factories by registering Zend\ServiceManager\AbstractFactory\ConfigAbstractFactory with your service manager instance. This allows you to define services using a configuration map, rather than having to create separate factories for each of your services.

Enabling the ConfigAbstractFactory

Enable the ConfigAbstractFactory in the same way that you would enable any other abstract factory.

Programmatically:

$serviceManager = new ServiceManager();
$serviceManager->addAbstractFactory(new ConfigAbstractFactory());

Or within configuration:

return [
    // zend-mvc:
    'service_manager' => [
        'abstract_factories' => [
            ConfigAbstractFactory::class,
        ],
    ],

    // zend-expressive or ConfigProvider consumers:
    'dependencies' => [
        'abstract_factories' => [
            ConfigAbstractFactory::class,
        ],
    ],
];

Like all abstract factories starting in version 3, you may also use the config abstract factory as a mapped factory, registering it as a factory for a specific class:

return [
    'service_manager' => [
        'factories' => [
            SomeCustomClass::class => ConfigAbstractFactory::class,
        ],
    ],
];

Configuration

Configuration should be provided via the config service, which should return an array or ArrayObject. ConfigAbstractFactory looks for a top-level key in this service named after itself (i.e., Zend\ServiceManager\AbstractFactory\ConfigAbstractFactory) that is an array value. Each item in the array:

As an example:

use Zend\ServiceManager\AbstractFactory\ConfigAbstractFactory;

return [
    ConfigAbstractFactory::class => [
        MyInvokableClass::class => [],
        MySimpleClass::class => [
            Logger::class,          
        ],
        Logger::class => [
            Handler::class,
        ],
    ],
];

The definition tells the service manager how this abstract factory should manage dependencies in the classes defined. In the above example, MySimpleClass has a single dependency on a Logger instance. The abstract factory will simply look to fulfil that dependency by calling get() with that key on the container passed to it. In this way, you can create the correct tree of dependencies to successfully return any given service.

In the above example, note that the abstract factory configuration does not contain configuration for the Handler class. At first glance, this appears as if it will fail; however, if Handler is configured directly with the container already — for example, mapped to a custom factory — the service will be created and used as a dependency.

As another, more complete example, consider the following classes:

class UserMapper
{
    public function __construct(Adapter $db, Cache $cache) {}
}

class Adapter
{
    public function __construct(array $config) {}
}

class Cache
{
    public function __construct(CacheAdapter $cacheAdapter) {}
}

class CacheAdapter
{
}

In this case, we can define the configuration for these classes as follows:

// config/autoload/dependencies.php or anywhere that gets merged into global config
return [
    ConfigAbstractFactory::class => [
        CacheAdapter::class => [], // no dependencies
        Cache::class => [
            CacheAdapter::class, // dependency on the CacheAdapter key defined above
        ],
        UserMapper::class => [
            Adapter::class, // will be called using normal factory defined below
            Cache::class, // defined above and will be created using this abstract factory
        ],
    ],
    'service_manager' => [
        'factories' => [
            Adapter::class => AdapterFactory::class, // normal factory not using above config
        ],
    ],    
],